Archive for the ‘tax’ Category

Don’t be worried – yet – about tardy T3s

via Don’t be worried – yet – about tardy T3s – The Globe and Mail.

I want to file my taxes and get my refund, but I’m still waiting for tax slips for a few REITs and ETFs that I own. Shouldn’t I have this information by now?

Not necessarily. Different types of tax slips have different mailing deadlines.

T5 slips – which report dividend and interest income – were supposed to be mailed out by the end of February, so you should have these by now.

But T3 slips – which report distributions from incDifferent types of tax slips have different mailing deadlines. (Mackon/Thinkstock)ome trusts (including real estate investment trusts), exchange-traded funds and mutual funds – have a deadline of March 31. So it could be a week or more before they land in your mailbox. T3s for REITs and ETFs are sent by your broker, whereas T3s for mutual funds are mailed directly by the fund company.

Occasionally, tax slips are delayed, however.

My discount broker, BMO InvestorLine, says on its website that it will “make every effort to ensure that tax slips are mailed by the date indicated; however, in the event that an issuer does not supply us with the necessary information in time, tax slips will be processed on an individual security basis and mailed as soon as the information is made available.”

I had a quick look on the websites of three ETF providers – iShares, BMO and Horizons – and the 2014 tax information has already been posted. I also checked the websites of three REITs – RioCan, Canadian REIT and Calloway – and they have also published the 2014 tax breakdowns for their distributions. So if you want to crunch the numbers yourself, you can. But to avoid mistakes on your return, you might want to wait until the official T3 slips arrive.

In the meantime, if you’re using tax software, you can always complete the rest of your return and then spend a couple of minutes entering the information from your T3 slips when they arrive. That way you’ll still get your return in long before the April 30 deadline.

Hell no, we won’t pay: How technology transformed our perception of value

Open Source. The backlash against Software Patents. Cloud Computing. Bitcoin. 3D Printing. Post-PC. Cord-Cutting. Electric Vehicles and Alternative Energy.

There are ideological and social drivers that are unique to every single one of these things, and yet there is a common thread that ties them together. I call this trend “anti-spendism”.

Anti-spendism is not necessarily a social movement that is tied to the betterment of society as a whole. It’s not like socialism or communism, where we are talking about a desire to more equitably distribute wealth to the have-nots.

It is by definition, the personal, self-centered desire not to expend capital at all. Or to put a more modern take on it, rapid advances in technology have so lowered our perceptions of what things should cost, that ultimately many goods and services have become devalued far below what people are willing to pay for them.

To put it bluntly, anti-spendism is “Hell no, we won’t pay” syndrome.

via Hell no, we won’t pay: How technology transformed our perception of value | ZDNet.

How to transfer cottage ownership – and reduce the tax bite

TIM CESTNICK

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Wednesday, Jun. 11 2014, 5:38 PM EDT

Last updated Thursday, Jun. 12 2014, 2:21 PM EDT

 

Cottage memories are like none other.

If you’re visiting a friend’s cottage this summer, here are a few tips that will be sure to create lasting memories for everyone: Bring four very large suitcases (store one in each bedroom if necessary), bring at least two dogs (those with digestive problems are best), start a fire (preferably outside the cottage, and big enough to burn a picnic table), roast marshmallows (bring those mini ones with toothpicks and see who can stand the heat) and scare the kids (ghost stories to give them nightmares for three days can add to the fun).

How to transfer cottage ownership – and reduce the tax bite – The Globe and Mail.

H&R Block has offered their top 10 tax myths:

Maternity leave income is not taxable. “You are required to report your EI benefits as income. In most cases, Service Canada withholds less than the lowest tax rate so you may have tax obligations at the end of the year.

RRSP contributions do not have to be reported if I do not use the deduction. “Even if you are not claiming a deduction for the contributions you made in the year, you are still required to record the fact that you made them. So all your contributions from March 2, 2012 until March 1, 2013 should be recorded on your 2012 tax return.”

Tips are not considered income. “Servers and others working in the hospitality industry are required to record and report their tips on their tax return. For servers, tips may be as much as 200-400 per cent of their income.”

Students get refunds on their tuition. “In order to receive a tax refund, you need to have overpaid your income tax during the year. If a student does not have taxable income, they cannot use their tuition and education credits on their return. They have the option to transfer up to $5,000 to a parent, grandparent or spouse or they can carry forward credits to use in future year.”

Mothers are required to claim the children first. “The lower income spouse is required to claim childcare expenses whether it is the mother or father. Either parent can claim the child tax credit.”

I earned less than $10,000 so I do not have to file a tax return. “Even if you did not earn more than the $10,822 personal amount, filing a tax return may trigger benefits like the quarterly GST/HST payment. And if you had tax withheld, you should receive a refund.”

I can claim a flat rate amount for my business mileage. “Self-employed Canadians are required to keep a logbook to calculate the auto expenses for their business.”

Child support is a tax deduction. “Unless your agreement is dated before May 1, 1997, child support payments are reported on your tax return but they are not a deduction or included in income.”

If I work outside of the country, I do not need to file a tax return. “The Canadian tax system is based on residency. If you are emigrating, you should indicate your date of exit on your last tax return. If you are working outside of the country but have substantial residential ties to Canada still, you will be required to file a Canadian tax return.”

Mortgage interest is a tax deduction. “Only self-employed Canadians who work from home are allowed to claim a percentage of their mortgage insurance as a business expense. The tax benefit of owning a home comes when you sell. Every Canadian receives a capital gains exemption on the sales of their principal residence.”

http://www.hrblock.ca/documents/TS13%20Media%20Advisory%20Tax%20Myths.pdf