Archive for the ‘wordpress’ Category

Volunteers needed to go bald

The home show head shave may be cancelled if participants don’t sign up

Read more: http://www.mrtimes.com/health/Volunteers+needed+bald/7951958/story.html#ixzz2KoJQxPg4

Allen LaRose is looking for a few or more brave volunteers willing to lose their locks at this spring’s home show in Maple Ridge.

Allen LaRose of Manion & Associates held up a picture with inspirational words from Ghandi, and a photo of himself from a past head shave for cancer.

The financial advisor/branch manager at Manion & Associates is hoping several helpers will sign up to have their heads shaved at the Ridge Meadows Home Show, held this year from May 3 to 5 at Albion Fairgrounds.

Each year at the home show, Manion & Associates hosts the Headshave for Cancer in support of the Ridge Meadows Hospital Foundation and Ridge Meadows Hospice Society.

LaRose said the fundraiser was organized by local firefighters, starting in 2001.

The volunteer group was made up mostly of emergency services personnel and RCMP members from Maple Ridge and Pitt Meadows.

LaRose originally got involved as a participant nearly a decade ago and since 2008, Manion & Associates has been the chief organizer, renting booth space and recruiting volunteer barbers.

In the early 2000s, most of the participants raised pledges, and those who didn’t simply donated money. The combined dollar totals was usually “a respectable amount,” LaRose said.

But support has dwindled in recent years.

“In the years that we haven’t had a larger group committing and taking part, the amount of dollars raised has been significantly smaller,” LaRose said.

Manion & Associates absorbs the cost of the booth rental and marketing the event, which includes producing posters and brochures. This ensures 100 per cent of the money raised go to the causes.

LaRose sacrifices roughly 150 hours of his own time to promote and organize the head shave, each year.

But in tougher economic times, LaRose is contemplating cancelling this year’s fundraiser.

“It’s getting to the point where we have to make a call: is it worth the effort and cost to put it on, if we’re not going to have the commitment of participants?” Larose said. “If I’m going to cut a cheque to run a head shave, I’m wondering, well, am I better off just donating the money directly to the charities.”

The crucial element moving forward is participants. “[These are] people who are willing to have their heads

shaved and go out and raise money, raise pledges,” LaRose said. “I know from experience it doesn’t take much to raise a couple hundred dollars in pledges per person.”

To get involved, call LaRose at 604-463-6060 or email him at allen@ manion.ca.

Originally, funds raised from the head shave went to the local hospital’s oncology department.

“But the hospital foundation came to us when we first took [the head shave] on and pointed out that cancer patients get treated by many parts of the hospital and not just the one department,” LaRose explained.

And, at one time, the head shave solely benefited the hospital foundation.

Then it became apparent to LaRose, who was on the hospice society board, that more than 80 per cent per cent of the people the hospice works with are cancer patients and their families.

Whether the head shave goes ahead or not, LaRose plans on contributing to causes that have had a direct effect on his life.

In September 2002, his mom Dee was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. As her condition worsened, Dee was admitted to Surrey Memorial Hospital, due to a lack of space in the palliative care unit at Ridge Meadows Hospital.

This was not ideal for Dee, according to her son, who said the best place for her would have been the McKenney Creek Hospice Facility, which did not exist at the time.

Dee died April 8, 2003.

After her death, because of the money raised from the head shave, Ridge Meadows Hospital acquired the equipment that would have treated Dee locally, instead of in Surrey.

The local hospital now has the equipment that would have allowed Dee to receive treatment in her own home.

tlandreville@mrtimes.com

© Copyright (c) Maple Ridge Times

Read more: http://www.mrtimes.com/health/Volunteers+needed+bald/7951958/story.html#ixzz2KoJjml8e

Advertisements

Estate planning: 10 things you need to know – Moneyville.ca.

Talking to your family about estate planning now can save trouble later after you're gone.

Many Canadians haven’t taken the most basic estate planning step which is writing a Will. They should.

Without a Will, your estate doesn’t automatically go to your spouse and children, but ends up being distributed according to the rules of your province For example,Ontario’s rules differ from those in Quebec and Manitoba. In addition, without proper planning, almost half the value of your assets could disappear to cover capital gains taxes and probate fees.

Here are 10 steps that can help ensure your final wishes are carried out simply and smoothly.

#1: List your assets

The first thing is to figure out what you have. So prepare an inventory of your assets. A net worth calculator can help you through the process.  The list should include your home, vacation properties and investments such as RRSPs or RRIFs. It should also include bank accounts, pensions, personal property like cars, boats or jewellery and the value of any insurance policies.

You should also list any debts that relate to these assets – such as loans or mortgages – and record the account numbers and institutions where the debts are held.

#2: Who gets your stuff?

Once you have a picture of what you have, you can figure out how to distribute it. In addition to family members, you may also wish to recognize other people and charitable causes as part of your legacy. In the case of charitable donations, a professional advisor can help you structure these to maximize their value for the recipient and for your estate.

Read the rest of the list…. Estate planning: 10 things you need to know – Moneyville.ca.

via U.S. best tax haven of all, author tells Canadians | MoneySense.

Forget the turquoise waters and white-sand beaches of offshore tax havens. Take your hard-earned Canadian pension and head stateside. That’s the advice Robert F. Keats has for snowbirds in his latest book, “A Canadian’s Best Tax Haven: The U.S –Take Your Money and Drive!”Thumbnail Image

Roughly 1,000 baby boomers retire each day in Canada and too many of them don’t know how to protect their money, according to Keats, a dual citizen and president of cross-border wealth management firm KeatsConnelly.

“Snowbirds are getting the wrong advice with respect to taxes, medical coverage and immigration,” he recently told MoneySense.

While it’s true that anyone with a sizeable RRSP or corporate pension could see upwards of 40% of their nest egg gobbled up by federal and provincial taxes once they begin withdrawals, relocating to the Caymen Islands or the Bahamas isn’t the answer.

Traditional tax haven islands aren’t havens at all for high-net worth Canadians, Keats said. The idea that you’ll keep more of your money on a tropical island is a “myth.”

Read the rest…. U.S. best tax haven of all, author tells Canadians | MoneySense.

Before trading in your home for an even larger one, ask yourself if you are truly ready for the super-sized financial commitment and the sacrifices that often come with it.

via Wealth: A new way to look at “How much house can I afford?” | MoneySense.

There are two very different ways to answer this question. The first is the traditional way—the way the lenders and realtors answer it: Based on your down payment, income and expenses, how much can you afford to put to a mortgage each month, and therefore how much can you borrow? Lenders are incented to encourage debt because, provided you don’t default, the more you borrow, the more they make. Realtors have a similar motivation because the more house you buy, the higher the commission.

[more…]

Watch out for identity theft

Identity theft has become one of the fastest growing crimes in North America. There are a number of ways identity theft can happen:

  1. Card theft: theft of credit cards from wallets or purses or even newly issued cards from your mailbox.
  2. Shoulder surfing: looking over your shoulder for your Personal Identification Number and using a fake ATM device to read your debit card’s data.
  3. Skimming: using a special device to swipe your credit card at a restaurant or gas station which records the personal information from your card.
  4. Spoofing: creating fake websites or emails that ask for credit card information.
  5. Theft from databases: identity thieves stealing large databases of personal information.

There are steps you can take to protect yourself:

  • Sign all credit cards when you receive them and never lend them to anyone.
  • Cancel and destroy credit cards you do not use and keep a list of the ones you use regularly.
  • Carefully check each of your monthly credit card statements and your bank statements. Immediately report lost or stolen credit cards and any discrepancies in your monthly statements to the issuing credit card company or bank.
  • Shred or destroy paperwork you no longer need.
  • Do not give personal information out over the phone, through the mail, or over the Internet unless you are the one who initiated the contact and know the person or organization with whom you are dealing.

If you are a victim of identity theft, immediately contact your bank or credit card company, your local police and the OPP/RCMP Phonebusters Unit at 1-888-495-8501, E-mail: info@phonebusters.com

http://www.dynamic.ca/eng/learning/Personal-Finances/Consumer-Watch-Out-For-Identity-Theft.asp

You’ll need the following: a cup of water, a cup of sugar, four large eggs, two cups of dried fruit, a teaspoon of baking soda, a teaspoon of salt, a cup of brown sugar, lemon juice, nuts, and a bottle of whisky.

Sample the whisky to check for quality.

Take a large bowl. Check the whisky again. To be sure it is the highest quality, pour one level cup and drink. Repeat. Turn on the electric mixer, beat one cup of butter in a large fluffy bowl. Add one teaspoon of sugar and beat again.

Make sure the whisky is still okay. Cry another tup. Turn off the mixer. Break two leggs and add to the bowl and chuck in the cup of dried fruit. Mix on the turner. If the fried druit gets stuck in the beaterers pry it loose with a drewscriver.

Sample the whisky to check for tonsisticity. Next, sift two cups of salt. Or something. Who cares? Check the whisky. Now sift the lemon juice and strain your nuts. Add one table. Spoon. Of sugar or something. Whatever you can find.

Grease the oven. Turn the cake tin to 350 degrees. Don’t forget to beat off the turner. Throw the bowl out of the window, check the whisky again and go to bed.