Posts Tagged ‘debt’

Buy a Car Based on the Monthly Payment Cost

Owak / Kulla / Corbis

“It’s dangerous to think about a big purchase, like a house or a car, in monthly terms,” says Jim Wang, a blogger at Bargaineering.com. “It doesn’t illustrate how much of your total wealth has to be surrendered in order to own that house or car.”

“It’s also easier to swallow $200 a month instead of a five-figure number, so salespeople are trained to go after the monthly number,” he says. Whenever a salesperson is giving you financial advice, he says, step back and evaluate whose best interest they have at heart, yours or theirs. Always do the math on what the purchase will cost you in the long run.

“I’d say focusing on the monthly price of anything, and ignoring all else, is terrible advice,” Wang says. “While it’s important to look at that number for the purposes of budgeting, you always want to know how much you’d be paying in total.”

MORE: Drivers Upgrading to New Cars at Slowest Pace in Years

Read more: http://moneyland.time.com/2012/08/23/terrible-financial-advice-top-10-tips-you-shouldnt-follow/#ixzz27bESknpt

A lot of people think that paying any amount owed on a debt acts as a good-faith effort and that creditors are obligated to work with you if you pay a nominal sum of, say, $5. This isn’t true. There’s no such thing as getting an A for effort when it comes to delinquent debt.

“The rationalization behind this theory is that some payment is better than no payment,” says Kimberly Cole, an education outreach coordinator at Novadebt. If you’ve worked out an agreement with a creditor to pay $5 a month, you’re in the clear, but there’s no automatic agreement that kicks in if you just send in whatever you want, she warns. “My clients are often shocked when I advise them that the collection activity will continue without an arrangement.”

Cole says borrowers who get in over their heads need to reach out to the creditor and work out a payment plan both parties agree to — and get it in writing.

Read more: http://moneyland.time.com/2012/08/23/terrible-financial-advice-top-10-tips-you-shouldnt-follow/#ixzz27VPpRUOn